Extended photometry for the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: a testbed for photometric redshift experiments

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1088/0067-0049/204/2/21
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TypeArticle
Journal titleThe Astrophysical Journal, Supplement Series
ISSN0067-0049
Volume204
Issue2
Article number21
AbstractThis paper describes a new catalog that supplements the existing DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey photometric and spectroscopic catalogs with ugriz photometry from two other surveys: the Canada-France-Hawaii Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Each catalog is cross-matched by position on the sky in order to assign ugriz photometry to objects in the DEEP2 catalogs. We have recalibrated the CFHTLS photometry where it overlaps DEEP2 in order to provide a more uniform data set. We have also used this improved photometry to predict DEEP2 BRI photometry in regions where only poorer measurements were available previously. In addition, we have included improved astrometry tied to SDSS rather than USNO-A2.0 for all DEEP2 objects. In total this catalog contains ∼27, 000 objects with full ugriz photometry as well as robust spectroscopic redshift measurements, 64% of which have r > 23. By combining the secure and accurate redshifts of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey with ugriz photometry, we have created a catalog that can be used as an excellent testbed for future photo-z studies, including tests of algorithms for surveys such as LSST and DES. © 2013. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); National Science Infrastructure
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21271784
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Record identifier9d185c2f-4530-4d32-aea8-27a5a22b24f6
Record created2014-04-17
Record modified2016-05-09
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