Relationship between the unbinding and main transition temperatures of phospholipid bilayers under pressure

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevE.69.031906
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TypeArticle
Journal titlePhys. Rev. E
Physical Review E
Volume69
Issue3
Pages031906–; # of pages: 1
AbstractUsing neutron diffraction and a specially constructed high pressure cell suitable for aligned multibilayer systems, we have studied, as a function of pressure, the much observed anomalous swelling regime in dimyristoyl- and dilauroyl-phosphatidylcholine bilayers, DMPC and DLPC, respectively. We have also reanalyzed data from a number of previously published experiments and have arrived at the following conclusions. (a) The power law behavior describing anomalous swelling is preserved in all PC bilayers up to a hydrostatic pressure of 240 MPa. (b) As a function of increasing pressure there is a concomitant decrease in the anomalous swelling of DMPC bilayers. (c) For PC lipids with hydrocarbon chains >~13 carbons the theoretical unbinding transition temperature T? is coupled to the main gel-to-liquid crystalline transition temperature TM. (d) DLPC is intrinsically different from the other lipids studied in that its T? is not coupled to TM. (e) For DLPC bilayers we predict a hydrostatic pressure (>290 MPa) where unbinding may occur.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Canadian Neutron Beam Centre
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12330215
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Record identifier9e8d9870-6fd3-48f1-ad55-6718f06917c9
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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