The Potential for demand responsive lighting in non-daylit offices

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TypeArticle
Journal titleLeukos
Volume3
IssueOctober 2
Pages105120; # of pages: 16
Subjectdemand response, load shedding, personal control, preferred illuminance, energy management; Lighting
AbstractParticipants (N=30) in an office laboratory had personal dimming control over lighting, and were then exposed to a simulated demand response (or ?load shed?) involving dimming lighting by 2% per minute. Participants were given no expectation that the dimming would occur, and the principal measure used was the point at which participants intervened to restore light levels after the demand-response dimming began. Results showed that 20% of participants intervened by the time that desktop illuminance declined ~35% from their initial preferred level, and 50% of participants intervened by the time that desktop illuminance declined ~50%. Therefore, during a power supply emergency, dimming lights can contribute relatively large electricity demand reductions before lighting declines to a level where a substantial fraction of people would be motivated to seek a change.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number48678
18153
NPARC number20377200
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Record identifier9f24d254-fa61-4a18-925e-b9bd545c32fc
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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