Forensics of water quality failure in distribution systems - a conceptual framework

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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Indian Water Works Association
Volume35
IssueOct/Dec. 4
Pages123; # of pages: 23
Subjectwater quality failure, water distribution, forensics, fuzzy sets, knowledgebase; Water quality
AbstractPrecise causes of water quality failures are often difficult to pinpoint. The complexity of the distribution system (many kilometers of pipes of different materials and ages), occurrences of physical/chemical/biological processes and the lack or absence of timely data make forensic analyses of water quality failure events very challenging. Water quality failure in the distribution system can occur through several pathways. These include intrusion of contaminants through failed or compromised pipes and cross-connections, regrowth of microbes in pipes and distribution storage tanks, leaching of chemicals or corrosion products from system components (pipes, tanks, liners), water treatment failure, deliberate contamination by terrorists and permeation of organic compounds through various plastic components of the system. Various indicators of water quality failure (symptoms) such as changes in the turbidity, odour, taste and colour, waterborne illnesses ranging from minor to serious, etc. can provide clues as to the causes of the failure in much the same way as symptoms of human health are used to diagnose causes and propose treatment.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC numberNRCC 46742
NRC-IRC-15904
NPARC number20379008
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Record identifier9f2551b3-d1f6-4444-8705-5a73c0f795cf
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2017-07-05
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