Determination of total mercury in biological samples using flow injection CVAAS following tissue solubilization in formic acid

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2005.07.027
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TypeArticle
Journal titleTalanta
ISSN0039-9140
Volume68
IssueFebruary 15 4
Pages12591263; # of pages: 5
SubjectMercury; Biological samples; Formic acid solubilization; Flow injection CVAAS
AbstractTotal mercury in biological samples was determined by flow injection (FI) cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS) following tissue solubilization with formic acid. A mixture of potassium bromide and potassium bromate was used to decompose organomercury compounds prior to their reduction with sodium borohydride. A gold amalgam system was used to achieve lower detection limits when required. National Research Council Canada certified reference materials dogfish liver (DOLT-3), dogfish flesh (DORM-2) and lobster hepatopancreas (TORT-2), as well as oyster tissue (NIST SRM 1566b) and mussel tissue (NIST SRM 2976) were used to assess the accuracy of the method. The method of standard additions provided the most accurate results. Limit of detection (LOD) for Hg in the solid sample of 0.001 and 0.01 μg g−1 were achieved with and without amalgamation, respectively. The precision of measurement for 1.6 ng ml−1 methylmercury was 2.7% using the amalgam system.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for National Measurement Standards; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
Identifier10294570
NRC number4001
NPARC number8897779
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Record identifiera02990e3-28ba-498c-9712-9d9c2d059c57
Record created2009-04-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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