Metaproteomics of aquatic microbial communities in a deep and stratified estuary

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/pmic.201500079
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TypeArticle
Journal titleProteomics
ISSN1615-9853
Volume15
Issue20
Pages35663579; # of pages: 14
Subjectcarrier protein; methanol; nitrogen; organic matter; RNA 16S; bacterial metabolism; estuary; Euryarchaeota; gene sequence; metagenomics; metaproteomics; microbial community; molecular weight; nitrification; Nitrospira; nutrient cycling; oxidation; proteomics; Thaumarchaeota
AbstractHere we harnessed the power of metaproteomics to assess the metabolic diversity and function of stratified aquatic microbial communities in the deep and expansive Lower St. Lawrence Estuary, located in eastern Canada. Vertical profiling of the microbial communities through the stratified water column revealed differences in metabolic lifestyles and in carbon and nitrogen processing pathways. In productive surface waters, we identified heterotrophic populations involved in the processing of high and low molecular weight organic matter from both terrestrial (e.g. cellulose and xylose) and marine (e.g. organic compatible osmolytes) sources. In the less productive deep waters, chemosynthetic production coupled to nitrification by MG-I Thaumarchaeota and Nitrospina appeared to be a dominant metabolic strategy. Similar to other studies of the coastal ocean, we identified methanol oxidation proteins originating from the common OM43 marine clade. However, we also identified a novel lineage of methanol-oxidizers specifically in the particle-rich bottom (i.e. nepheloid) layer. Membrane transport proteins assigned to the uncultivated MG-II Euryarchaeota were also specifically detected in the nepheloid layer. In total, these results revealed strong vertical structure of microbial taxa and metabolic activities, as well as the presence of specific "nepheloid" taxa that may contribute significantly to coastal ocean nutrient cycling.
Publication date
PublisherWiley
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21277012
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Record identifiera6f5dc43-3133-47fe-a2e8-3df2a4abb238
Record created2015-11-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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