A review of guidelines on ice roads in Canada: determination of bearing capacity

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Proceedings titleTAC 2015: Getting You There Safely - 2015 Conference and Exhibition of the Transportation Association of Canada = ATC: Destination sécurité routière - 2015 Congrès et Exposition de l'Association des transports du Canada
ConferenceThe ‘Winter Road Maintenance - Getting You There Safely’ Session of the 2015 Conference of the Transportation Association of Canada, Charlottetown, PEI
AbstractAn ice road is a winter road that runs mostly on frozen water expanses. A significant number of guidelines (best practices, design codes, handbooks and manuals) currently exist for the construction, maintenance and usage of these structures. They are typically published by provincial jurisdictions, the private sector and some research organizations. They are also found in the scientific literature. These guidelines include various amount of information of different types, notably some background on the nature of the ice cover, how it should be used for transportation purposes and how to determine the maximum load it can safely sustain. For the latter, Gold’s formula is almost always alluded to, and is used in slightly different ways. Significant differences are noted in the guidelines’ recommendations regarding the strength of white ice relative to clear ice, resulting in a large discrepancy in recommended maximum loads. Although white ice is mechanically weaker than clear ice, the influence of that difference on the bearing capacity has yet to be understood. New empirical data, numerical and analytical studies and physical testing are possibilities to investigate this issue.
Publication date
AffiliationOcean, Coastal and River Engineering; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC numberOCRE-PR-2016-009
NPARC number21277620
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Record identifiera845257c-db83-49f6-aca2-23118232ee0e
Record created2016-05-05
Record modified2016-05-27
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