Influence of circulating cytokines on prolactin during slow vs. fast exertional heat stress followed by active or passive recovery

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00523.2012
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Applied Physiology
ISSN8750-7587
1522-1601
Volume113
Issue4
Pages574583
Subjectneuroimmune response; core temperature; peripheral fatigue marker; serotonin and dopamine interplay
AbstractProlactin (PRL) has been suggested as an indicator of fatigue during exertional heat stress (EHS), given its strong relationship with body core temperature (Tc); however, the strength of this relationship during different rates of Tc increase and subsequent recovery is unknown. In addition, given the influence that systemic cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, have on the pituitary gland, it would be of interest to determine the relationship between PRL, IL-6, and TNF-α during EHS. The purpose was to examine the PRL, IL-6, and TNF-α heat stress responses during slow and fast heating and subsequent resting or cold water immersion recovery. On 4 days, nine individuals walked at ∼45% (slow heating) or ran at ∼65% (fast heating) maximal oxygen consumption on a treadmill in the heat (40°C, 30% relative humidity) until rectal temperature (Tre) reached 39.5°C (esophageal temperature; fast = 39.41 ± 0.04°C, slow = 39.82 ± 0.09°C). Post-EHS, subjects were either immersed in 2°C water or rested seated until Tre returned to 38.0°C. Venous blood, analyzed for PRL, IL-6, and TNF-α, was obtained at rest, during exercise (Tre 38.0, 39.0, 39.5°C), the start of recovery (∼5 min after 39.5°C), and subsequent recovery (Tre 39.0, 38.0°C). IL-6 exhibited myokine properties, given the greater increases with slow heating and lack of increase in TNF-α. A strong temperature-dependent PRL response during slow and fast heating provides additional support for the use of PRL as a peripheral marker of impending fatigue, which is independent of IL-6 and TNF-α cytokine responses.
Publication date
PublisherAmerican Physical Society
LanguageEnglish
Peer reviewedYes
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NPARC number23001225
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Record identifieraac8e376-676b-4dcf-b742-1efc65ba60aa
Record created2017-01-06
Record modified2017-01-06
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