New friction mechanisms revealed by ice crushing-friction tests on high-roughness surfaces

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.coldregions.2016.08.002
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TypeArticle
Journal titleCold Regions Science and Technology
ISSN0165-232X
Volume131
Pages19
SubjectIce crushing-friction; Highly-lubricating ice-melt slurry; Solid-solid fluid interface friction mechanism; Surprising low friction on rough surfaces; New friction mechanisms; Self-generating ice/melt squeeze film
AbstractIce crushing occurs to varying degrees in many situations including those that involve a sliding frictional component, such as in sports involving ice contact, ice interaction with bridges, piers, ship hulls, vehicle wheels, rock beds under glaciers and ice-on-ice sliding/crushing interaction within glaciers and extraterrestrial ice masses (on Saturn's moon Enceladus). Here results of ice crushing-friction experiments on high-roughness surfaces with regular arrays of small prominences are presented. Friction coefficients were extraordinarily low and were proportional to the ratio of the tangential sliding rate and the normal crushing rate. All of the friction coefficient variation was determined by the fluid dynamics of a slurry that flowed through channels that developed between leeward-facing facets of the prominences and the moving ice. The slurry originated from a highly-lubricating self-generating squeeze film of ice particles and melt located between the encroaching intact ice and the surfaces.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationOcean, Coastal and River Engineering; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC numberOCRE-PR-2016-001
NPARC number23000845
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Record identifieraaeee823-1462-4c3a-a40b-1eb39f276c91
Record created2016-10-18
Record modified2016-10-19
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