Herschel view of the Taurus B211/3 filament and striations: evidence of filamentary growth?

Download
  1. (PDF, 1 MB)
  2. Get@NRC: Herschel view of the Taurus B211/3 filament and striations: evidence of filamentary growth? (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201220500
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleAstronomy & Astrophysics
ISSN0004-6361
1432-0746
Volume550
Article numberA38
Pages19
SubjectStar formation; ISM individual objects; B211–ISM clouds; ISM structure
AbstractWe present first results from the Herschel Gould Belt survey for the B211/L1495 region in the Taurus molecular cloud. Thanks to their high sensitivity and dynamic range, the Herschel images reveal the structure of the dense, star-forming filament B211 with unprecedented detail, along with the presence of striations perpendicular to the filament and generally oriented along the magnetic field direction as traced by optical polarization vectors. Based on the column density and dust temperature maps derived from the Herschel data, we find that the radial density profile of the B211 filament approaches power-law behavior, ρ ∝ r⁻².⁰± ⁰.⁴, at large radii and that the temperature profile exhibits a marked drop at small radii. The observed density and temperature profiles of the B211 filament are in good agreement with a theoretical model of a cylindrical filament undergoing gravitational contraction with a polytropic equation of state: P ∝ ργ and T ∝ ργ⁻¹, with γ = 0.97 ± 0.01 < 1 (i.e., not strictly isothermal). The morphology of the column density map, where some of the perpendicular striations are apparently connected to the B211 filament, further suggests that the material may be accreting along the striations onto the main filament. The typical velocities expected for the infalling material in this picture are ~0.5–1 km s⁻¹, which are consistent with the existing kinematical constraints from previous CO observations.
Publication date
PublisherEDP Sciences
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Science Infrastructure; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
Identifieraa20500-12
NPARC number23000377
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifieraafdccc7-bf4b-4710-86dd-1b2c6d148d93
Record created2016-07-12
Record modified2016-07-12
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)