Comparing gray and white matter fMRI activation using asymmetric spin echo spiral

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jneumeth.2012.06.014
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Neuroscience Methods
ISSN0165-0270
Volume209
Issue2
Pages351356
SubjectAsymmetric spin echo; fMRI; White matter; Contrast-to-noise
AbstractRecent developments have shown that it is possible to detect functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation in white matter (WM). Enhanced sensitivity to WM fMRI signals has been associated with the asymmetric spin echo (ASE) spiral sequence. The ASE spiral sequence produces three consecutive images that have equal blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast but increasing T2 contrast. The current study evaluated whether ASE spiral sensitivity differed between white and gray matter in the corpus callosum, superior parietal lobes, cingulate gyrus, and inferior frontal lobes. Contrast and noise were compared across the three images for each region. Results showed increasing gains in functional contrast in both white and gray matter as a function of T2 contrast. The third image, with the most T2 contrast, showed the largest increase in contrast, while changes in noise were maintained. The results suggest that ASE spiral increases fMRI sensitivity globally through the addition of T2 weighted contrast.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationMedical Devices; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierS0165027012002397
NPARC number21268794
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Record identifierab9d44d7-ea8d-413d-a13a-d67ee8587dda
Record created2013-11-13
Record modified2016-05-09
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