Evaluation of the Dynamic Seismic Analysis Recommended for the 1975 National Building Code

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TypeArticle
Journal titlePaper, Division of Building Research, National Research Council Canada
Issue694
Pages20
SubjectEarthquakes; seismic method; earthquake engineering; building dynamics; methode sismique; calcul parasismique; dynamique des constructions
AbstractAs an alternative to the static seismic load analysis of buildings, a recommended dynamic seismac procedure is presented in Commentary K of Supplement No. 4 t0 the 1975 Edition of the National Building Code of Canada (NBC). In this paper comparisons are presented between the recommended response spectrum and the following: a) the average response spectrum by Housner; b) the response spectra by Newark, Blume and Kapur, and by Newark and Hall; c) the seismic coefficient S of the 1975 NBC; and d) the product of the coefficients SKI applicable to cross-braced water towers. Detailed comparisons of storey shears and overturning moments are presented for three buildings, as calculated from the 1975 NBC and the recommended dynamic analysis. Although there is over-all agreement in the forces obtained from the two methods, for regular buildings the recommended dynamic analysis is more conservative in the short period range (approximately 0.5 s), and less conservative in the long period range (approximately 2 s and greater) than the 1975 NBC seismic requirements.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
IdentifierDBR-P-694
NRC number15479
4526
NPARC number20358590
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Record identifierac3b8f6b-3a7a-43d7-b587-94fcf72ffc62
Record created2012-07-20
Record modified2016-05-09
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