Stress-strain curves for high strength concrete at elevated temperatures

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)0899-1561(2004)16:1(84)
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Materials in Civil Engineering
Volume16
IssueJan/Feb. 1
Pages8494; # of pages: 11
SubjectHigh performance / High strength concrete; Fire
AbstractThe effects of high temperature on strength and stress-strain relationship of high strength concrete (HSC) were investigated. Stress-strain curve tests were conducted at various temperatures (20, 100, 200, 400, 600 and 800oC) for four types of HSC. The variables considered in the experimental study included concrete strength, type of aggregate, and the addition of steel fibers. Results from stress-strain curve tests show that plain HSC exhibits brittle properties below 600oC, and ductility above 600oC. HSC with steel fibers exhibits ductility for temperatures over 400oC. The compressive strength of HSC decreases by about a quarter of its room temperature strength within the range of 100-400oC. The strength further decreases with the increase of temperature and reaches about a quarter of its initial strength at 800oC. The strain at peak loading increases with temperature; from 0.003 at room temperature to 0.02 at 800oC. Further, the increasein strains for carbonate aggregate HSC is larger than that for siliceous aggregate HSC.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number46973
16133
NPARC number20378102
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Record identifierac53a5b7-66b4-4374-96bd-aeb320e2abc4
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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