Speciation of methyl- and inorganic mercury in biological tissues using ethylation and gas chromatography with furnace atomization plasma emission spectrometric detection

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1039/a607729c
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry
ISSN0267-9477
Volume12
Issue5
Pages597601; # of pages: 5
AbstractA sensitive and interference-free method for the quantification of inorganic and methylmercury species in biological tissues is presented using purge-and-trap injection–GC–AES. Samples were solubilized with tetramethylammonium hydroxide and the ionic species were purged from aqueous solution after ethylation with sodium tetraethylborate. The species were preconcentrated on Tenax-TA and thermally desorbed onto an isothermal (90 °C) GC column packed with 15% OV-3 on Chromasorb W. The separated species were eluted in He to a FAPES source for detection by AES at 253.6 nm. Absolute detection limits of 1 and 7 pg for inorganic and methylmercury, respectively, can be obtained, corresponding to concentration LODs of 0.2 and 1.4 ng g -1 , respectively, in solid tissue samples. Precision of determination is better than 10% RSD. The accuracy of the technique was validated by the analysis of National Research Council of Canada CRMs DORM-2, DOLT-2 and TORT-2, certified for mercury species content.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for National Measurement Standards; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
Identifier10391186
NRC number1250
NPARC number8898489
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Record identifierac6f1324-fa98-4924-8530-be8319bc31bf
Record created2009-04-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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