Modification of the extracellular matrix in the infarcted rat heart probed by FTIR spectroscopy

DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-0371-8_221
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TypeBook Chapter
Proceedings titleSpectroscopy of Biological Molecules : 6th European Conference on the Spectroscopy of Biological Molecules, 3–8 September 1995, Villeneuve d’Ascq, France
Conference6th European Conference on the Spectroscopy of Biological Molecules, September 3–8, 1995, Villeneuve d’Ascq, France
ISBN978-94-010-4166-9
978-94-011-0371-8
Pages483484; # of pages: 2
AbstractHeart disease remains the leading cause of death in the industrialised world, accounting for 50% of all deaths in North America. Overwhelmingly the most important form of heart disease is ischaemic heart disease (IHD), which usually (90% of cases) takes the form of a myocardial infarction (MI) as a result of artherosclerosis (AS). Fissuring of an AS plaque results in thrombosis, which can cause blockage of the coronary arteries leading to ischaemia. Prolonged ischaemia (20 minutes) leads to irreversible damage to the heart. If the initial ischaemic event is survived, significant modifications of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the heart become apparent after about 7 days, leading to pronounced scar formation after 6–8 weeks. As the ECM plays an important role in maintaining the mechanical and electrical properties of the heart, modifications of the ECM have pronounced pathological effects, resulting in reduced compliance of the left ventricle and potentially fatal arrhythmias (due to modification of conduction properties of the tissues).
Publication date
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Biodiagnostics
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number419
NPARC number9742702
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Record identifieradef5fbd-e3ea-40e3-8c08-8d8d63702a59
Record created2009-07-17
Record modified2016-12-02
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