Genes similar to naphthalene dioxygenase genes in trifluralin-degrading bacteria

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1002/ps.835
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TypeArticle
Journal titlePest Management Science
Volume60
Issue5
Pages474478; # of pages: 5
SubjectBacteria; env; Genes
AbstractTrifluralin (,,-trifluoro-2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropyl-p-toluidine) is a dinitroaniline compound which was first produced in the 1960s and has been used extensively as an agricultural herbicide. There are a few publications on the biodegradation of this xenobiotic compound, but to our knowledge nothing has been documented on the genetic aspects of its catabolism. In this article, we report the analysis of DNA isolated from bacteria previously shown to degrade trifluralin, using as probes the catabolic genes ndoB, todC, xyIX, catA and xyIE which encode the enzymes naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase, toluene dioxygenase, toluate 1,2-dioxygenase, catechol 1,2-dioxygenase and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase respectively. Using PCR and hybridization analysis, the strong hybridization of the ndoB gene with DNA extracted from four trifluralin-degrading isolates was demonstrated, although none of them was able to degrade naphthalene, as indicated by the clear zone test. The results indicated the presence in these bacteria of a dioxygenase gene, whose product could act on trifluralin as its principal substrate, or fortuitously, by cometabolism. This is the first publication on genes in trifluralin-degrading bacteria. Copyright � 2003 Society of Chemical Industry
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Biotechnology Research Institute; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number45973
NPARC number3538753
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Record identifieraf440fbc-a953-419e-b559-1a72c49c2fa7
Record created2009-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
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