Low-temperature tapered-fiber probing of diamond nitrogen-vacancy ensembles coupled to GaP microcavities

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1088/1367-2630/13/5/055023
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TypeArticle
Journal titleNew Journal of Physics
ISSN1367-2630
Volume13
Article number55023
SubjectCavity mode; Device performance; Ensemble averaging; Free space; High contrast; Optical microcavities; Purcell factor; Selective detection; Tapered optical fibers; Gallium alloys; Low temperature testing
AbstractIn this work, we present a platform for testing the device performance of a cavity-emitter system, using an ensemble of emitters and a tapered optical fiber. This method provides high-contrast spectra of the cavity modes, selective detection of emitters coupled to the cavity and an estimate of the device performance in the single-emitter case. Using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond and a GaP optical microcavity, we are able to tune the cavity onto the NV resonance at 10 K, couple the cavity-coupled emission to a tapered fiber and measure the fiber-coupled NV spontaneous emission decay. Theoretically, we show that the fiber-coupled average Purcell factor is 2-3 times greater than that of free-space collection, although due to ensemble averaging it is still a factor of 3 less than the Purcell factor of a single, ideally placed center. © IOP Publishing Ltd and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); Security and Disruptive Technologies
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21271979
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Record identifierb1543a3e-06b5-4ccf-8105-a501f0d110a7
Record created2014-05-15
Record modified2016-05-09
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