Vibrations in AO control: A short analysis of on-sky data around the world

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Vibrations in AO control: A short analysis of on-sky data around the world (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1117/12.925984
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Proceedings titleSPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering. Proceedings
ConferenceAdaptive Optics Systems III, 1 July 2012 through 6 July 2012, Amsterdam
ISSN0277-786X
ISBN9780819491480
Volume8447
Article number84471C
SubjectAdaptive optics systems; Disturbance identification; H2 control; High frequency vibration; Large binocular telescope; LQG control; Residual vibrations; Tip-tilt; Very large telescope; Vibration mitigation; Vibration peak; William herschel telescopes; Adaptive optics; Atmospheric turbulence; Controllers; Identification (control systems); Optical telescopes; Power spectral density; Spectrum analysis; Telescopes; Vibrations (mechanical); Discrete time control systems
AbstractWe present in this paper an analysis of several tip-tilt on-sky data registered on adaptive optics systems installed on different telescopes (Gemini South, William Herschel Telescope, Large Binocular Telescope, Very Large Telescope, Subaru). Vibration peaks can be detected, and it is shown that their presence and location may vary, and that their origin is not always easy to determine. Mechanical solution that have been realized to mitigate vibrations are presented. Nevertheless, residual vibrations may still affect the instruments' performance, ranging from narrow high frequency vibration peaks to wide low frequency windshake-type perturbations. Power Spectral Densities (PSDs) of on-sky data are presented to evidence these features. When possible, indications are given regarding the gain in performance that could be achieved with adequate controllers accounting for vibration mitigation. Two examples of controller identification and design illustrate their ability to compensate for various types of disturbances (turbulence, windshake, vibration peaks, ...), showing a significant gain in performance. © 2012 SPIE.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics (HIA-IHA)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21269218
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierb1e2132b-5437-4a8e-a272-c166359b8ed2
Record created2013-12-12
Record modified2017-04-24
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)