Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry investigation of the reversed-phase separation of fullerenes and their derivatives

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1021/ac00065a012
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TypeArticle
Journal titleAnalytical Chemistry
ISSN0003-2700
1520-6882
Volume65
Issue17
Pages22362242
AbstractThe separation of fullerenes and their derivatives on four commercially available reversed-phase columns was investigated using liquid chroma¬tography/mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. Three octadecyl-silica stationary phases were incapable of ade¬quately separating the fullerenes according to the number of carbons. However, baseline resolution of nearly all the fullerenes (up to at least C96) was achieved with a 2-(1-pyrenyl) ethylsilica phase. The resolution of individual fullerene isomers, on the other hand, was best accomplished with a poly¬ meric octadecylsilica bonded phase. A proposed mechanism for this unique ability combines the shape selectivity of polymeric phases, previously recognized for planar polycyclic aromatic hydro¬ carbons, and the different "molecular footprints" of the isomers. This retention mechanism can also be used to explain the increasingly lower retention times of successively substituted fullerenes; groups bonded to the fullerene surface appear to disrupt adsorptive interactions between the fullerene molecular footprints and the stationary phases.
Publication date
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Marine Biosciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23000877
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Record identifierb4bcbfbc-14f4-435f-9052-866f3f7ee0b3
Record created2016-11-02
Record modified2016-12-16
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