Modeling of oxidation-driven soot aggregate fragmentation in a laminar coflow diffusion flame

Download
  1. (PDF, 628 KB)
  2. Get@NRC: Modeling of oxidation-driven soot aggregate fragmentation in a laminar coflow diffusion flame (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/00102200903463050
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleCombustion Science and Technology
Volume182
Issue4
Pages491504; # of pages: 14
SubjectFragmentation pattern; Laminar coflow diffusion flame; Oxidation-driven soot aggregate fragmentation; Soot modeling
AbstractIn this study, three different oxidation-driven soot aggregate fragmentation models with 1:1, 2:1, and 10:1 fragmentation patterns are developed and implemented into a laminar coflow ethylene/air diffusion flame, together with a pyrene-based soot model and a sectional aerosol dynamics model. It is found that the average degree of particle aggregation (np) in the soot oxidation region is not correctly predicted if oxidation-driven aggregate fragmentation is neglected; whereas the incorporation of aggregate fragmentation significantly improves the np prediction in the soot oxidation region. Similar results are obtained using the 1:1 and 2:1 fragmentation patterns. However, as the pattern ratio increases to 10:1, appreciable difference in the predicted np is observed. As the pattern ratio becomes larger, the fragmentation effect diminishes and the predicted np approaches that of the original model neglecting fragmentation.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number52207
NPARC number15990713
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierb538614e-69e2-4a2c-bd6b-3de979e5de06
Record created2010-08-31
Record modified2016-05-10
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)