Comparing the observable properties of dwarf galaxies on and off the Andromeda plane

Download
  1. (PDF, 1 MB)
  2. Get@NRC: Comparing the observable properties of dwarf galaxies on and off the Andromeda plane (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1088/2041-8205/799/1/L13
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleThe Astrophysical Journal
ISSN2041-8213
Volume799
Issue1
PagesL13
Subjectdark matter-galaxies; dwarf; fundamental parameters; kinematics and dynamics; local group
AbstractThe thin, extended planes of satellite galaxies detected around both the Milky Way and Andromeda are not a natural prediction of the Λ-cold dark matter paradigm. Galaxies in these distinct planes may have formed and evolved in a different way (e.g., tidally) from their off-plane neighbors. If this were the case, one would expect the on- and off-plane dwarf galaxies in Andromeda to have experienced different evolutionary histories, which should be reflected by the chemistries, dynamics, and star formation histories of the two populations. In this work, we present new, robust kinematic observations for two on-plane M31 dwarf spheroidal galaxies (And XVI and XVII) and compile and compare all available observational metrics for the on- and off-plane dwarfs to search for a signal that would corroborate such a hypothesis. We find that, barring their spatial alignment, the on- and off-plane Andromeda dwarf galaxies are indistinguishable from one another, arguing against vastly different formative and evolutionary histories for these two populations.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23000816
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierb5b68b23-12c9-4a00-aef1-010eddd3fb49
Record created2016-10-17
Record modified2016-10-17
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)