Recent results and future DMs for astronomy and for space applications at CILAS

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Recent results and future DMs for astronomy and for space applications at CILAS (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1117/12.2056287
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Proceedings titleSPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering. Proceedings
ConferenceAdaptive Optics Systems IV, 22 June 2014 through 27 June 2014
ISSN0277-786X
ISBN9780819496164
Volume9148
Article number91480G
SubjectAberrations; Astronomy; Deformation; Laser pulses; Mirrors; Optical coatings; Space applications; bimorph; Deformable mirrors; Extremely Large Telescopes; Ground-based telescopes; High order corrections; monomorph; Operational temperature; Piezo stack; Adaptive optics
AbstractWe present recent experimental results obtained with CILAS deformable mirrors (DMs) or demonstration prototypes in solar and night-time astronomy (with ground-based telescopes) as well as observation of the Earth (with space telescopes). These important results have been reached thanks to CILAS technology range composed of monomorph and piezostack deformable mirrors, drivers and optical coatings. For instance, the monomorph technology, due to a simple architecture can offer a very good reliability for space applications. It can be used for closed or open loop correction of the primary mirror deformation (thermal and polishing aberrations, absence of gravity). It can also allow a real-time correction of wavefront aberrations introduced by the atmosphere up to relatively high spatial and temporal frequencies for ground-based telescopes. The piezostack technology is useful for very high order correction at high frequency and under relatively low operational temperature (down to -30°C), which is required for future Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs). This wide range of applications is exposed through recent examples of DMs performances in operation and results obtained with breadboards, allowing promising DMs for future needs.
Publication date
PublisherSPIE
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; National Science Infrastructure
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21275532
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierb5d6dde1-ab63-4756-8800-540f6f7f37c0
Record created2015-07-14
Record modified2017-04-24
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)