Material chemistry of perovskite compounds as chemical sensors

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TypeArticle
Journal titleSensors and Actuators B
Volume59
Pages190194; # of pages: 5
SubjectPerovskite; Thin film; Oxygen sensor; SrFeO2.5+x; SrFeO3
AbstractThe advantages of applying non-stoichiometric perovskite materials in chemical sensor applications are reviewed and highlighted with particular reference to the SrFeO2.5+x system. The phase relationships of SrFeO2.5+x for (0 < x < 0.5) are described and differences identified with the substituted material, SrFe0.9Cu0.1O2.5+x, such that the prospect of 'tunable' chemical and physical properties is identified. Thin films of the parent perovskite have been prepared by the pulsed laser deposition technique and gas sensor functionality determined by exploiting the effects of gas exposure upon a number of physical properties. There is a large change in the electrical conductivity of SrFeO2.5+x thin-films when exposed to variations in oxygen partial pressure over a wide temperature range as shown in this and previous work. These changes are rapid and reversible at the temperature of the present work at 763 K. The chemical sensing properties of the subject perovskite are compared to two other perovskite materials. Many of the perovskite family of materials in the form of thin-films are well-suited to integration into microsensor devices on various substrate platforms.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology; NRC Industrial Materials Institute; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number51703
NPARC number12455153
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Record identifierb6158a2f-a683-4ecc-b4a7-640b14b911cf
Record created2009-10-09
Record modified2016-05-09
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