Isolation and characterization of an anaerobic, cellulolytic microorganism, Acetivibrio cellulolyticus gen. nov., sp. nov

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1099/00207713-30-1-179
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TypeArticle
Journal titleInternational Journal of Systematic Bacteriology
Volume30
Issue1
Pages179185; # of pages: 7
AbstractA new genus of cellulolytic, gram-negative, nonsporeforming, anaerobic bacteria is described. The colonies produced by these bacteria on cellulose agar were round, clear, translucent, and cream-colored and had an undulate margin. Single cells of the bacterium were straight to slightly curved rods 0.5 to 0.8 μm wide by 4 to 10 μm long and were motile by means of a single flagellum located one-third of the distance from the end of the cell. Among the various substrates tested, only cellulose, cellobiose, and salicin were able to support growth. The major fermentation products of cellobiose or cellulose degradation were acetic acid, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. The deoxyribonucleic acid base composition of the type species was 38 mol% guanine plus cytosine. The name Acetivibrio is proposed for this new genus, which is placed in the family Bacteroidaceae. The type species, Acetivibrio cellulolyticus sp. nov., is named on the basis of its cellulolytic activity. The type strain of A. cellulolyticus is CD2 (= NRC 2248).
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Biological Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
NRC numberPATEL1980
17999
NPARC number9375900
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Record identifierb7de42f9-2eb2-48c1-85c5-807ff154e404
Record created2009-07-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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