Microarray-based detection of extended virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene profiles in phylogroup B2 Escherichia coli of human, meat and animal origin

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1099/jmm.0.033993-0
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Medical Microbiology
ISSN0022-2615
Volume60
Issue10
Pages15021511; # of pages: 10
Subjectantibiotic resistance; article; avian pathogenic Escherichia coli; bacterial gene; bacterial strain; bacterial virulence; bacterium detection; broiler; chicken meat; cluster analysis; enteroaggregative Escherichia coli; enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli; enteroinvasive Escherichia coli; enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli; Escherichia coli; gene expression profiling; genotype; human; major clinical study; microarray analysis; nonhuman; pathogenic Escherichia coli; pork; priority journal; Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli; urinary tract infection; uropathogenic Escherichia coli; Animals; Chickens; Cluster Analysis; Drug Resistance, Bacterial; Escherichia coli; Escherichia coli Infections; Genotype; Humans; Meat; Microarray Analysis; Molecular Epidemiology; Molecular Typing; Swine; Urinary Tract Infections; Virulence Factors
AbstractExtra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) causing urinary tract infections (UTIs) most often belong to phylogenetic group B2 and stem from the patient's own faecal flora. It has been hypothesized that the external reservoir for these uropathogenic E. coli in the human intestine may be meat and food-production animals. To investigate such a connection, this study analysed an E. coli phylogroup B2 strain collection (n=161) of geographical and temporally matched isolates, published previously, from UTI patients (n=52), community-dwelling humans (n=36), imported (n=5) and Danish (n=13) broiler chicken meat, Danish broiler chickens (n=17), imported (n=3) and Danish (n=27) pork, and healthy Danish pigs (n=8). The isolates were subjected to microarray analysis for 315 virulence genes and variants and 82 antimicrobial resistance genes and variants. In total, 133 different virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes were detected in at least one UTI isolate. Between 66 and 87 of these genes were also detected in meat and animal isolates. Cluster analyses of virulence and resistance gene profiles, respectively, showed that UTI and community-dwelling human isolates most often grouped with meat and animal isolates, indicating genotypic similarity among such isolates. Furthermore, B2 isolates were detected from UTI patients and meat, with indistinguishable gene profiles. A considerable proportion of the animal and meat isolates belonged to the ExPEC pathotype. In conclusion, these findings suggest that B2 E. coli from meat and animal origin can be the source of most of the virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes detected in uropathogenic E. coli isolates and that there is a general resemblance of animal, meat and UTI E. coli based on extended gene profiling. These findings support the hypothesis of a zoonotic link between E. coli causing UTIs and E. coli from meat and animals. © 2011 SGM.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Biotechnology Research Institute (BRI-IRB)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21271538
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Record identifierb7e63ce0-d293-425b-a44c-00c6c18aafd7
Record created2014-03-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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