Kinetics of the δ to γ zirconium hydride transformation in Zr-2.5Nb

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/S1359-6454(03)00004-1
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TypeArticle
Journal titleActa Materialia
Volume51
Issue7
Pages20412053; # of pages: 13
SubjectElectron energy loss spectroscopy; Hydrides; Neutron diffraction; Phase transformation kinetics; Zirconium alloys
AbstractWhen the concentration of hydrogen exceeds the solubility limit in a metal matrix, metal hydrides may appear as precipitates that degrade the performance of the material. Neutron diffraction was combined with microscopy to study the [delta] to [gamma] phase transformation of zirconium hydride precipitates in Zr-2.5 wt.% Nb. Specimens were heated to dissolve all hydrides, then cooled to holding temperatures ranging from 17-100 ?C, to investigate the kinetics of transformation from the high-temperature [delta]-hydride to the low-temperature [gamma]-hydride. The [delta] to [gamma] transformation proceeds over a period of many hours, with a rate that increases as the holding temperature is decreased. Transmission Electron Microscopy images indicate that the boundary regions of hydride precipitates transform to the [gamma]-phase, leaving a shrinking core of the [delta]-phase. The crystallographic orientations of the hydrides appear to be determined by the texture of the [alpha]-Zr matrix, even after complete dissolution and re-precipitation.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Canadian Neutron Beam Centre
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12339140
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Record identifierb8b99d7a-4645-473e-afae-a2c1a6110777
Record created2009-09-11
Record modified2016-05-09
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