Simulation of the spatial distribution and molecular weight of polymethylmethacrylate fragments in electron beam lithography exposures

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Simulation of the spatial distribution and molecular weight of polymethylmethacrylate fragments in electron beam lithography exposures (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1116/1.2181580
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Vacuum Science Technology B
Volume24
Issue2
Pages768779; # of pages: 12
Subjectelectron beam lithography; electron-surface impact; kinetic theory; molecular weight; nanolithography; polymers; resists
AbstractWe report a three-dimensional (3D) simulation model based on the kinetic transport theory for calculating the distribution of PMMA fragments after an exposure to electron impact. The conditions employed for the modeling were chosen to resemble a typical electron beam lithography exposure. The model accounts for inelastic collisions of electrons in PMMA and resulting random main-chain scissions. We have considered gratings composed of parallel lines distanced by 10–50 nm and exposed to electrons with energies of 10–60 keV. By the model simulations, we have generated and analyzed the detailed 3D distributions of small PMMA fragments (one to ten monomers) that are soluble at the development stage and thus are responsible for the clearance in the gratings. In terms of the spatial distributions of soluble fragments, we have formulated the criteria that define the total clearance as well as the local grating development and investigated their dependence on the grating period, electron dose, and energy.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; National Institute for Nanotechnology
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12339278
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierb98f69cb-b64f-4b57-8d36-7f18ea8cc4b5
Record created2009-09-11
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)