Lack of glucose and hsp70 responses in haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus (L.) subjected to handling and heat shock

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8649.2007.01697.x
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Fish Biology
Volume72
Issue1
Pages157167; # of pages: 11
AbstractJuvenile haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus (c. 39 g) were exposed to either a handling stressor (1 min out of water) or heat shock (increase from 10 to 15° C for 1 h), and plasma cortisol, plasma glucose and gill hsp70 levels were determined before, and at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h post-stress. The pattern of cortisol increase was similar following both stressors, with levels increasing by 25-fold at 1 h post-stress, but returning to pre-stress levels (2–5 ng ml−1) by 3 h. In contrast, neither handling nor heat shock caused an increase in plasma glucose levels. Although gill hsp70 was detected, presumably constitutive levels, in both control and heat shocked groups, there were not significant changes in gill hsp70 levels after exposure to heat shock. The lack of glucose and hsp70 responses to these typical stressors is consistent with previous studies on Atlantic cod Gadus morhua, and suggests that the stress physiology of Gadidae differs from the ‘typical’ teleost.
Publication date
PublisherWiley
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Marine Biosciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierNRC-ACRD-55920
NRC number1462
NPARC number3538269
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Record identifierba311530-d70d-4da4-950f-c6e036610097
Record created2009-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
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