Gas phase detection of tributyltin chloride arising from aqueous and solid matrices

Download
  1. (PDF, 388 KB)
  2. Get@NRC: Gas phase detection of tributyltin chloride arising from aqueous and solid matrices (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1039/b207944e
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry
ISSN0267-9477
Volume17
Issue11
Pages15061510; # of pages: 5
AbstractThe vapour phase above water spiked with tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) and PACS-2 sediment certified reference material was sampled with a solid phase microextraction fiber. The collected volatile compounds were analysed by GC-MS using a HBr–methanol-treated capillary column. Two ion sources were used for this study and their performance characteristics compared. These were electron impact (EI) and negative chemical ionisation (NCI), which allowed both detection of trace amounts of analytes (NCI source) and their identification. This approach provides structural information on the sampled species; at this stage no quantitation was attempted. TBTCl can be detected in the vapour phase above saline water or PACS 2 sediment after one night of passive sampling without any stirring or heating of the sample. This work indicates the need to consider evaporation of TBT as the chloride as a mechanism of loss of this analyte from water or sediment. This may take place from natural settings and contributes to the global biogeochemical cycle of tin; hydride or methyl forms of trace metals are not the only compounds capable of volatilising into the atmosphere.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for National Measurement Standards; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
Identifier10391186
NRC number108
NPARC number8900361
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierbb51e1cb-7c4f-4cbb-baa9-006902cf0c0f
Record created2009-04-22
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)