Low-temperature electrical transport in bilayer manganite La1.2Sr1.8Mn2O7

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.65.134439
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TypeArticle
Journal titlePhysical review. B, Condensed matter and materials physics
Volume65
Pages134439–; # of pages: 6
AbstractThe temperature T and magnetic-field H dependences of anisotropic in-plane rhoab and out-of-plane rhoc resistivities are investigated in single crystals of the bilayer manganite La1.2Sr1.8Mn2O7. Below the Curie transition temperature Tc=125 K, rhoab and rhoc display almost the same temperature dependence with an up-turn around 50 K. In the metallic regime (50 K <=T<= 110 K), both rhoab(T) and rhoc(T) follow a T9/2 dependence, consistent with the two-magnon scattering. We found that the value of the proportionality coefficient Bfitab and the ratio of the exchange interaction Jab/Jc, obtained by fitting the data, are in excellent agreement with the calculated Bab based on the two-magnon model and Jab/Jc deduced from neutron scattering, respectively. This provides further support for this scattering mechanism. At even lower T, in the nonmetallic regime (T<50 K), both the in-plane sigmaab and out-of-plane sigmac conductivities obey a T1/2 dependence, consistent with weak-localization effects. Hence this demonstrates the three-dimensional metallic nature of the bilayer manganite La1.2Sr1.8Mn2O7 at Tc.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12329138
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Record identifierbd6e2d09-8595-41aa-9b60-427e259fe6b3
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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