Photodegradation of CL-20 : insights into the mechanisms of initial reactions and environmental fate

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Photodegradation of CL-20 : insights into the mechanisms of initial reactions and environmental fate (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2004.06.032
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleWater Research
Volume38
Issue19
Pages40554064; # of pages: 10
Subjectenv; Solutions; Water
AbstractHexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (HNIW) or CL-20 is a caged structure polycyclic nitramine that may replace RDX and HMX as a common use energetic chemical. To provide insight into the environmental fate of CL-20 we photolyzed the chemical in a Rayonet photoreactor (254-350 nm) and with sunlight in aqueous solutions. Previously, we found that initial photodenitration of the monocyclic nitramine RDX leads to ring cleavage and decomposition. Presently, we found that photolysis of the rigid molecule CL-20 produced NO2-, NO3-, NH3, HCOOH, N2 and N2O. Using LC/MS (ES-) we detected several key intermediates carrying important information on the initial steps involved in the degradation of CL-20. The identities of the intermediates were confirmed using a uniformly ring labeled15 N-(CL-20). When CL-20 was photolyzed in the presence of H218O, D2O or18 O2 we obtained a product distribution suggesting that the energetic chemical degraded via at least two initial routes; one involved sequential homolysis of N-NO2 bond(s) and another involved photorearrangement prior to hydrolytic ring cleavage and decomposition in water. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Biotechnology Research Institute
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number47198
NPARC number3538979
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierbd8d3f43-304b-4f00-b226-01a75ca1dba7
Record created2009-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)