Carbonation of granulated blast furnace slag cement concrete during twenty years of field exposure

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TypeArticle
Proceedings titleACI SP
ConferenceFly, Ash, Silica Fune, Slag, and Natural Pozzolans in Concrete : Proceeding of the 2nd International Conference: 1986, Madrid, Spain
ISSN0193-2527
VolumeN91
Issue2
Pages144562; # of pages: 1384
Subjectcarbonation; portland slag cement; tensile strength; exposed concrete; blast furnace slag; chemical analysis; field tests; portland cements; portland slag cements; reinforced concrete; tensile strength; Concrete
AbstractTwo experimental houses, one of ordinary portland cement ( OPC) concrete and the other of granulated blast furnace slag cement (GBFSC) concrete, were built under carefully controlled and documented conditions. After 20 years of exposure, cores were analysed and significant carbonation to 40 mm in depth was detected to TGA and the wet chemical method. More significantly, little Ca(OH)2 was found in the GBFSC concrete at all levels, so that any reinforcing steel would have to be considered susceptible to corrosion. According to Hg porosimetry results, the porosity of OPC concrete decreased after carbonation but that of GBFSC concrete with carbonation was indicated by coarsening of the pores, and the tensile strength of the surface region suffered a large decrease.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierIRC-P-1398
NRC number26203
1952
NPARC number20377856
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Record identifierbf239155-7666-4b34-9ccf-353f050e1a22
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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