Microwave-assisted extraction of lignin from triticale straw : optimization and microwave effects

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2011.11.079
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TypeArticle
Journal titleBioresource Technology
Volume104
Pages775782; # of pages: 8
SubjectMicrowave; Conventional heating; Triticale straw; Lignin; ³¹P NMR
AbstractPresently lignin is used as fuel but recent interests in biomaterials encourage the use of this polymer as a renewable feedstock in manufacturing. The present study was undertaken to explore the potential applicability of microwaves to isolate lignin from agricultural residues. A central composite design (CCD) was used to optimize the processing conditions for the microwave (MW)-assisted extraction of lignin from triticale straw. Maximal lignin yield (91%) was found when using 92% EtOH, 0.64 N H2SO4, and 148 °C. The yield and chemical structure of MW-extracted lignin were compared to those of lignin extracted with conventional heating. Under similar conditions, MW irradiation led to higher lignin yields, lignins of lower sugar content, and lignins of smaller molecular weights. Except for these differences the lignins resulting from both types of heating exhibited comparable chemical structures. The present findings should provide a clean source of lignin for potential testing in manufacturing of biomaterials.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Biotechnology Research Institute; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number53399
NPARC number19291032
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Record identifierbf2f4aed-209a-42e4-9ff4-35293e5f9928
Record created2012-03-06
Record modified2016-05-09
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