Metabolism of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine by Clostridium biofermentans strain HAW-1 and several other H2-producing fermentative anaerobic bacteria

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.femsle.2004.06.016
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TypeArticle
Journal titleFEMS Microbiology Letters
Volume237
Issue1
Pages6572; # of pages: 8
SubjectBacteria; env; metabolism
AbstractSeveral H2-producing fermentative anaerobic bacteria including Clostridium, Klebsiella and Fusobacteria degraded octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) (36 muM) to formaldehyde (HCHO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) with rates ranging from 5 to 190 nmol h-1 g (dry weight) of cells-1. Among these strains, C. bifermentans strain HAW-1 grew and transformed HMX rapidly with the detection of the two key intermediates the mononitroso product and methylenedinitramine. Its cellular extract alone did not seem to degrade HMX appreciably, but degraded much faster in the presence of H2, NADH or NADPH. The disappearance of HMX was concurrent with the release of nitrite without the formation of the nitroso derivative(s). Results suggest that two types of enzymes were involved in HMX metabolism: one for denitration and the second for reduction to the nitroso derivative(s). Copyright 2004 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Biotechnology Research Institute; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number47197
NPARC number3539251
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Record identifierc193a626-5710-40ff-b49a-6307aab366db
Record created2009-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
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