Laser-induced orbital projection and diffraction of O-2 with velocity map imaging

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1080/09500340.2013.771755
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Modern Optics
ISSN0950-0340
1362-3044
Volume60
Issue17
Pages13951408; # of pages: 14
Subjectvelocity map imaging; laser induced electron diffraction; orbital imaging
AbstractIn a velocity map imaging spectrometer, we measured the electron momentum distributions from the ionization of O molecules with 800 nm wavelength, 40 fs laser pulses at a peak intensity of W cm. The molecules were aligned at 0, 45 and 90 relative to the laser polarization prior to ionization. We show that for all alignments the low momentum region – populated by direct electrons which do not recollide with the parent ion – is consistent with the ionized orbital being filtered and projected onto the continuum electron wave packet. In the high momentum region – populated by rescattered electrons – we observe that the pattern created by diffraction of the recolliding wave packet by the ion core disappears as the alignment gets closer to the laser field axis. We find that a two-slit diffraction model agrees well with the results for molecules aligned at 90, but only partially predicts the decrease in the diffraction signature for smaller alignment angles.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationSecurity and Disruptive Technologies; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21270333
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Record identifierc1b66326-d38b-49b0-ba27-5d7722c084c5
Record created2014-01-30
Record modified2016-05-09
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