Field studies of response of peat to plate loading

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Journal titleJournal of the Soil Mechanics and Foundations Division
Pages949967; # of pages: 19
Subjectsoil consolidation; peat; plate bearing tests; soil mechanics; moisture content; settlement; consolidation; consolidation coefficient; elastic deformation; elasticity; elastic theory; field data; field tests; loading rate; organic soils; peat; permeability; plate load tests; pore water pressures; primary consolidation; secondary compression; settlement; soil mechanics; time settlement relationship
AbstractThis paper presents the results of a series of small-scale field tests carried out to investigate the in situ deformational characteristics of a soft peat, particularly in the vicinity of a load discontinuity. A 3-ft diam plate was used toapply loads to the surface of a 10-ft thick stratum of nonwoody fine fibrous peat with a moisture content of about 950%. Rates and magnitudes of settlement, and pore pressures at five positions were measured and compared. Field results were supplemented by data obtained from a limited number of oedometer-type laboratory consolidated tests, conducted with and without pore pressure measurements. The geometry of the settlement-logarithmic time plots is described. Emphasis is placed on the prevalence of horizontal drainage and its significance. The departure of soft organic materials from the predicted behavior as based upon the linear theory of elasticity is described, and possible reasons for lack of agreement are presented.
Publication date
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number10968
NPARC number20374359
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Record identifierc2403e29-0f27-49dd-9ddb-c51b8f8c8115
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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