Assessment of a sewage sludge treatment on cadmium, copper and zinc bioavailability in barley, ryegrass and earthworms

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Assessment of a sewage sludge treatment on cadmium, copper and zinc bioavailability in barley, ryegrass and earthworms (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2006.04.001
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleEnvironmental Pollution
Volume145
Issue1
Pages4150; # of pages: 10
SubjectCopper; env; Zinc; metal; bioaccumulation; toxicity; speciation; interaction
AbstractThe toxicity and bioavailability of metals were assessed to verify the efficiency of a new chemical leaching process (METIX-AC) to minimizethe risk of metals found in municipal sewage sludge. For this purpose, sludge samples were spiked with cadmium, copper and/or zincbefore being treated using METIX-AC. The sludge decontamination resulted in a removal of spiked metals (79e89%), in a decrease of themore labile fractions, and in a corresponding increase of the residual fraction. The toxicity observed after exposure of two plant species, barley(Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne), and a terrestrial invertebrate, Eisenia andrei, to sludge-soil mixtures, disappeared after treatment, although the adverse effects were minor before treatment. The sludge treatment also significantly decreased the bioaccumulation of cadmium, copper, and zinc in the exposed species. For cadmium, maximum tissue concentrations of 0.45 0.08 mg/kg in barley, 0.79 0.27 mg/kg in ryegrass, and 21.82 1.85 mg/kg in earthworm exposed to sludge before treatment decreased after treatment to values similar to thoseobserved with negative controls.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Biotechnology Research Institute
Peer reviewedNo
NRC number49000
NPARC number3539505
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierc26ace12-afb0-4f3f-af61-b90995141b3f
Record created2009-03-01
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)