Lipid phase transitions in fatty acid-homogeneous membranes of Acholeplasma laidlawii B

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/0009-3084(82)90003-2
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TypeArticle
Journal titleChemistry and Physics of Lipids
ISSN0009-3084
Volume30
Issue1
Pages1726
SubjectAcholeplasma; membranes; infrared; FT-IR; phase transitions; lipids
AbstractThe thermotropic behaviour of fatty acid-homogeneous membranes of Acholeplasma laidlawii B was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The organism was grown at 37°C in the presence of avidin, an inhibitor of fatty acid synthesis, in a medium supplemented with pentadecanoic acid-d₂₉; the enrichment of the membranes with this fatty acid was 95%. The temperature-dependent phase behaviour of the membranes was studied via the C–D stretching vibrational modes of the membrane lipids and was compared with that of the lipid extract. The high level of fatty acid homogeneity results in a sharp (for natural membranes) gel to liquid crystalline phase transition. The transition, in both the membranes and extracted lipids, is centered at about 6°C above the growth temperature. During the transition two principal liquid states are evident, one being more conformationally ordered than the other. The effect of proteins on the principal lipid phase transition is minimal. However, in the intact membranes there is evident a weaker, lower temperature transition, which is not evident in the extracted lipids.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number19833
NPARC number23001424
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Record identifierc3413df3-7737-4d57-a272-4dbe7721839b
Record created2017-02-03
Record modified2017-02-03
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