Density-functional theory, finite-temperature classical maps, and their implications for foundational studies of quantum systems

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/442/1/012030
AuthorSearch for:
TypeArticle
Proceedings titleJournal of Physics: Conference Series
Conference6th International Workshop on Decoherence, Information, Complexity and Entropy: Spacetime - Matter - Quantum Mechanics - From the Planck Scale to Emergent Phenomena, DICE 2012, September 17-21, 2012, Castiglioncello, Tuscany, Italy
ISSN1742-6588
Volume442
Issue1
Article number12030
SubjectDe Broglie wavelength; Decoherence models; Density distributions; Hohenberg-Kohn theorem; Local correlations; Macroscopic systems; Pair distribution functions; Pauli exclusion effects; Density functional theory; Quantum electronics; Quantum optics
AbstractThe advent of the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem in 1964, its extension to finite-T, Kohn-Sham theory, and relativistic extensions provide the well-established formalism of density-functional theory (DFT). This theory enables the calculation of all static properties of quantum systems without the need for an n-body wavefunction ψ. DFT uses the one-body density distribution instead of ψ. The more recent time-dependent formulations of DFT attempt to describe the time evolution of quantum systems without using the time-dependent wavefunction. Although DFT has become the standard tool of condensed-matter computational quantum mechanics, its foundational implications have remained largely unexplored. While all systems require quantum mechanics (QM) at T=0, the pair-distribution functions (PDFs) of such quantum systems have been accurately mapped into classical models at effective finite-T, and using suitable non-local quantum potentials (e.g., to mimic Pauli exclusion effects). These approaches shed light on the quantum → hybrid → classical models, and provide a new way of looking at the existence of non- local correlations without appealing to Bell's theorem. They also provide insights regarding Bohmian mechanics. Furthermore, macroscopic systems even at 1 Kelvin have de Broglie wavelengths in the micro-femtometer range, thereby eliminating macroscopic cat states, and avoiding the need for ad hoc decoherence models.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationSecurity and Disruptive Technologies; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21270514
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Record identifierc3c20ad8-2112-41a6-9095-41bee10f006a
Record created2014-02-14
Record modified2016-05-09
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