Characterization by infrared spectroscopy of the bilayer to nonbilayer phase transition of phosphatidylethanolamines

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1021/bi00514a024
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TypeArticle
Journal titleBiochemistry
ISSN0006-2960
1520-4995
Volume20
Issue11
Pages31383145
AbstractA Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic study of the thermotropic behavior of egg yolk phosphatidylethanolamines is reported. Two phase changes were monitored, the gel to liquid-crystalline acyl chain melting transition, centered at 12 ºC, and a transition from the liquid-crystalline to the inverted hexagonal phase, centered at 28 ºC. It is demonstrated that the gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition results in a large increase in the conformational disorder of the acyl chains in the bilayer and that the nonbilayer phase contains a still higher degree of conformational disorder. It is shown that the transition to the inverted hexagonal phase is promoted by highly unsaturated acyl chains. A model is developed for the bilayer to nonbilayer phase transition in which it is proposed that the driving force which triggers this phase transition is the introduction of a degree of conformational disorder so high that the integrity of the bilayer surface can no longer be maintained, due to the volume requirements of the acyl chains. A number of previously reported data are rationalized in terms of this hypothesis.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Biological Sciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number18867
MANTSCH1981A
NPARC number9361641
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Record identifierc4055013-d1f8-4547-affe-24df7d0b4cb2
Record created2009-07-10
Record modified2017-03-24
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