High temperature PEM fuel cells

  1. Get@NRC: High temperature PEM fuel cells (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpowsour.2006.05.034
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Journal titleJournal of Power Sources
Pages872891; # of pages: 20
SubjectHign temperature; PEMFCs; Development; Testing and diagnostics
AbstractThere are several compelling technological and commercial reasons for operating H2/air PEM fuel cells at temperatures above 100 °C. Rates of electrochemical kinetics are enhanced, water management and cooling is simplified, useful waste heat can be recovered, and lower quality reformed hydrogen may be used as the fuel. This review paper provides a concise review of high temperature PEM fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) from the perspective of HT-specific materials, designs, and testing/diagnostics. The review describes the motivation for HT-PEMFC development, the technology gaps, and recent advances. HT-membrane development accounts for ∼90% of the published research in the field of HT-PEMFCs. Despite this, the status of membrane development for high temperature/low humidity operation is less than satisfactory. A weakness in the development of HT-PEMFC technology is the deficiency in HT-specific fuel cell architectures, test station designs, and testing protocols, and an understanding of the underlying fundamental principles behind these areas. The development of HT-specific PEMFC designs is of key importance that may help mitigate issues of membrane dehydration and MEA degradation.
Publication date
AffiliationNRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number8900911
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Record identifierc4f8c14a-3cb5-4ecd-ba5f-394b5e2be035
Record created2009-04-22
Record modified2016-05-09
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