Direct structural measurements of relaxation processes during transformations in amorphous ice

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.68.184110
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TypeArticle
Journal titlePhys. Rev. B
Physical Review B
Volume68
Issue18
Pages184110–; # of pages: 1
AbstractSequential structure-factor data have been collected during the transformation from relaxed high-density to low-density amorphous ice at temperatures above 105 K. Trends in the measured structure factor and in particular the height of the first sharp diffraction peak as a function of its position show that, at ambient pressure, this transformation is clearly divided into two distinct structural relaxation trends. The corresponding radial-distribution functions show that the first of these relaxational processes may be described by a continuous depletion of the �interstitial oxygen� located in the 3.6 � region, i.e., between the first- and second-coordination shells of the low-density amorphous form, and a corresponding sharpening of oxygen-oxygen correlations with characteristic lengths of 2.75 and 4.5 �. At the end of this relaxation process, the basic structural features of the low-density amorphous form have been established and are described by well-defined first- and second-coordination shells. This is followed by a second, distinctly different, relaxation process that is characterized by much smaller changes at 2.75 and 3.6 � and a smooth expansion at longer length scales.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12328021
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Record identifierc580a43f-956e-4231-a574-f5737d5aa181
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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