Gender differences in the relationship between smoking and frailty: Results from the Beijing longitudinal study of aging

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/gls166
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
ISSN1079-5006
Volume68
Issue3
Pages338346; # of pages: 9
Subjectage; aged; article; China; cohort analysis; educational status; female; frail elderly; health status; human; longitudinal study; male; marriage; mortality; multivariate analysis; sex difference; smoking; Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; China; Cohort Studies; Educational Status; Female; Frail Elderly; Health Status; Humans; Longitudinal Studies; Male; Marital Status; Mortality; Multivariate Analysis; Sex Factors; Smoking
AbstractBackground. Smoking is common in China, where the population is aging rapidly. This study evaluated the relationship between smoking and frailty and their joint association with health and survival in older Chinese men and women.Methods.Data came from the Beijing Longitudinal Study of Aging, a representative cohort study with a 15-year follow-up. Community-dwelling people (n = 3257) aged more than 55 years at baseline were followed between 1992 and 2007, during which time 51% died. A frailty index (FI) was constructed from 28 self-reported health deficits.Results.Almost half (1,485 people; 45.6%) of the participants reported smoking at baseline (66.8% men, 25.3% women). On average, male smokers were frailer (FI = 0.17±0.13) than male nonsmokers (FI = 0.13±0.10; p =. 038). No such differences were seen in women. Men who smoked had the lowest survival probability; female nonsmokers had the highest. Compared with female nonsmokers, the risk of death for male smokers was 1.58 (95% CI = 1.41-1.95; p <. 001), adjusted for age and education. Across all FI values, female smokers and male nonsmokers had comparable survival rates.Conclusion.Smoking was associated with an increased rate of both worsening health and mortality. At all levels of health status, as defined by deficit accumulation, women who smoked lost the survival advantage conferred by their sex. © 2012 The Author.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Institute for Biodiagnostics (IBD-IBD)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21269924
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Record identifierc6780428-4d29-411c-960d-5a6b189f70ce
Record created2013-12-13
Record modified2016-05-09
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