Inhibition of pure cultures of methanogens by benzene ring compounds

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TypeArticle
Journal titleApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume57
Issue10
Pages29692974; # of pages: 6
AbstractThe inhibition of methane production by Methanosaeta concilii GP6, Methanospirillum hungatei GP1, Methanobacterium espanolae GP9, and Methanobacterium bryantii M.o.H. during short-term (6-h) exposure to eight benzene ring compounds was studied. The concentration that caused 50% inhibition of the methane production rate (IC50) was dependent on the species and the toxicant. Pentachlorophenol was the most toxic of the tested compounds, with an IC50 of less than 8 mg/liter for all species except M. hungatei. Abietic acid was the next most toxic compound for all the species, with an IC50 in the range of 21.4 to 203 mg/liter. Sodium benzoate was generally the least toxic, with an IC50 in the range of 1,225 to 32,400 mg/liter. 3-Chlorobenzoate was substantially more toxic (IC50, 450 to 1,460 mg/liter) than benzoate. The inhibition by benzene, phenol, vanillic acid, and toluene was intermediate to that of pentachlorophenol and benzoate. Long-term incubation (days) studies to determine effect on growth indicated that all eight compounds were usually much more toxic than predicted from the short-term data. In these latter studies, there was generally a good correlation in the observed inhibition as determined from growth and methane production.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Biological Sciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NRC numberPATEL1991
31963
NPARC number9367207
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Record identifierc6ca57bd-94c4-4fa3-9d36-c02d22de3c29
Record created2009-07-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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