Towards developing skylight design tools for thermal and energy performance of atriums in cold climates

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/S0360-1323(02)00008-2
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TypeArticle
Journal titleBuilding and Environment
Volume37
IssueDec 12
Pages12891316; # of pages: 28
Subjectskylight; atrium; Energy efficiency; Skylights; Atriums
AbstractThis paper presents an analysis of the impact of selected design alternatives on the thermal and energy performance of atriums based on the methodology outlined in the accompanying paper. Computer simulation programs were used to predict the impact of the selected design alternatives on the design performance outputs of atriums. Design alternatives focused on fenestration glazing types, fenestration surface area, skylight shape, atrium type, and interaction of the atrium with its adjacent spaces. Design performance outputs, evaluated with respect to a basecase design, included seasonal solar heat gain, cooling and heating peak loads and annual cooling, heating and total (heating plus cooling) energy. Design tools were developed to quantify the impact of the design alternatives on the performance outputs. The design tools were cast into two-dimensional linear relationships with the glazing U-value and SHGC as independent parameters. The results for the enclosed atriums showed that the annual cooling energy ratio increased at a rate of 1.196 per unit of SHGC ratio and decreased at a rate of 0.382 per unit of U-value ratio. However, the annual heating energy ratio increased at a rate of 1.954 per unit of U-value ratio and decreased at a rate of 1.081 per unit of SHGC ratio. Similar trends were also found for the three-sided and linear atriums. Pyramidal/pitched skylights increased the solar heat gain ratio by up to 25% in the heating season compared to flat skylights. The effect of the skylight shape on the annual cooling and heating energy may be positive or negative, depending on the glazing U-value and SHGC ratios and the atrium type. Atriums open to their adjacent spaces reduced the annual cooling energy ratio by up to 76% compared to closed atrium spaces. However, open atrium spaces increased the annual heating energy ratio by up to 19%.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number44249
15156
NPARC number20386477
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Record identifierc6f97c65-6913-4205-90bd-23e1e001dd4b
Record created2012-07-25
Record modified2016-05-09
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