Soil characteristics more strongly influence soil bacterial communities than land-use type

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Soil characteristics more strongly influence soil bacterial communities than land-use type (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6941.2011.01192.x
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleFEMS Microbiology Ecology
ISSN0168-6496
Volume79
Issue1
Pages1224; # of pages: 13
Subjectbacterial DNA; RNA 16S; abundance; electrokinesis; land use change; microbial community; pH; phosphate; phylogenetics; polymerase chain reaction; real time; soil carbon; soil microorganism; soil nitrogen; Alphaproteobacteria; article; bacterium; biodiversity; chemistry; classification; denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis; DNA sequence; Gammaproteobacteria; genetics; growth, development and aging; microbiology; Netherlands; phylogeny; real time polymerase chain reaction; soil; Alphaproteobacteria; Bacteria; Biodiversity; Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis; DNA, Bacterial; Gammaproteobacteria; Netherlands; Phylogeny; Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction; RNA, Ribosomal, 16S; Sequence Analysis, DNA; Soil; Soil Microbiology
AbstractTo gain insight into the factors driving the structure of bacterial communities in soil, we applied real-time PCR, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoreses, and phylogenetic microarray approaches targeting the 16S rRNA gene across a range of different land usages in the Netherlands. We observed that the main differences in the bacterial communities were not related to land-use type, but rather to soil factors. An exception was the bacterial community of pine forest soils (PFS), which was clearly different from all other sites. PFS had lowest bacterial abundance, lowest numbers of operational taxonomic units (OTUs), lowest soil pH, and highest C N ratios. C N ratio strongly influenced bacterial community structure and was the main factor separating PFS from other fields. For the sites other than PFS, phosphate was the most important factor explaining the differences in bacterial communities across fields. Firmicutes were the most dominant group in almost all fields, except in PFS and deciduous forest soils (DFS). In PFS, Alphaproteobacteria was most represented, while in DFS, Firmicutes and Gammaproteobacteria were both highly represented. Interestingly, Bacillii and Clostridium OTUs correlated with pH and phosphate, which might explain their high abundance across many of the Dutch soils. Numerous bacterial groups were highly correlated with specific soil factors, suggesting that they might be useful as indicators of soil status. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved 79 1 January 2012 10.1111/j.1574-6941.2011.01192.x Research Article Research Articles © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Biotechnology Research Institute (BRI-IRB)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21269363
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierc7950bdf-d9c6-4fb6-8afe-d2aae7446ee2
Record created2013-12-12
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)