Macroregion size measurements in bimodal titanium forgings using two-dimensional autocorrelation method

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s11661-009-0128-3
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TypeArticle
Journal titleMetallurgical and Materiels Transactions A
Volume41
Issue3
Pages744750; # of pages: 7
SubjectMacroregion Size Measurements; titanium forging; microstructure pattern; mean linear intercept (MLI)
AbstractEtching patterns displayed on the surfaces of near-alpha titanium forgings (alloy IMI834) were quantified in terms of sizes and orientations using a two-dimensional (2-D) autocorrelation method. These patterns, which can be associated with local variations of microstructure and further related to regions of specific crystallographic orientations, are known to play a significant role in fatigue and dwell fatigue life predictions. It is then necessary to quantify their dimensions in a manufactured part in order to build a better statistical approach for life prediction in titanium forgings. These distributions of macroregion size and shape were examined on forging cross sections. A data analysis methodology based on a 2-D autocorrelation was used to process sample image data and quantify the macroregion characteristics. The results are more precise than those obtained using a mean linear intercept (MLI) method and additional useful information can be gathered.
Publication date
PublisherSpringer
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); NRC Industrial Materials Institute
Access conditionavailable
unlimited
public
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number52404
NPARC number14607294
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Record identifierc7b8d315-d71a-4aed-8495-2fc52bd4bd48
Record created2010-04-13
Record modified2016-05-09
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