Thickness dependence of the failure modes of ice from field observations on wide structures

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TypeArticle
Proceedings titleRecent development of offshore engineering in cold regions : POAC'07 Dalian, China, June 27-30, 2007 : proceedings : 19th International Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering Under Arctic Conditions
Series titleProceedings: International Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering under Arctic Conditions
Conference19th International Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering Under Arctic Conditions, POAC-07, June 27-30, 2007, Dalian, China
ISSN0376-6756
2077-7841
ISBN978-7-5611-3631-7
Volume1
Pages286295; # of pages: 10
AbstractThis paper presents a discussion of the ice failure modes that have been observed on wide caisson structures in the Arctic. These failure modes include ice bending (flexure), buckling, mixed mode, crushing, splitting and creep. It was found that bending and buckling are observed only for thinner ice whereas mixed mode, crushing and splitting are observed for all thicknesses of first-year ice with moving ice sheets. Creep is observed only with low loading rates. Analysis shows that the line loads increase with the ice thickness in a linear manner for ice crushing. This behavior appears to continue for thicker, Old Ice. The scatter in data is large with mixed mode and there is no clear trend of line load with ice thickness. There is insufficient information to determine the thickness dependence of bending, buckling, splitting or creep.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Canadian Hydraulics Centre
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number12341001
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Record identifierca0f9a90-5bb7-49df-9d05-85cf4e3e0599
Record created2009-09-11
Record modified2016-05-09
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