Uncoupled axial, flexural, and circumferential pipe-soil interaction analyses of partially supported jointed water mains

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1139/T04-048
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleCanadian Geotechnical Journal
Volume41
IssueDecember 6
Pages9971010; # of pages: 14
Subjectjointed water mains, Winkler model, pipe-soil interaction, elasto-plastic soil; Water mains
AbstractPipelines used in the distribution of potable water are a vital part of everyday life. The pipelines buried in soil?backfill are exposed to different deleterious reactions; as a result, the design factor of safety may be significantly degraded and, consequently, pipelines may fail prematurely. Proactive pipeline management, which entails optimal maintenance, repair, or replacement strategies, helps increase the longevity of pipelines. The effect of different deterioration mechanisms and operating conditions needs to be understood to develop good proactive management practices. In this paper, a Winkler-type analytical model is developed to quantify the contributions of different stress drivers, e.g., pipe material type and size, bedding conditions, and temperature. Sensitivity analyses indicate that the extent of the unsupported length developed as a result of scour has a significant influence on the flexural pipe?soil response. As well, plastic pipes tolerate less loss of support than metallic pipes.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number46630
15770
NPARC number20386468
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Record identifierca3398be-2571-4b47-9a06-4491ccd58593
Record created2012-07-25
Record modified2016-05-09
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