Components of the cultivated red seaweed Chondrus crispus enhance the immune response of Caenorhabditis elegans to Pseudomonas aeruginosa through the pmk-1, daf-2/daf-16, and skn-1 pathways

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.01927-13
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TypeArticle
Journal titleApplied and Environmental Microbiology
ISSN0099-2240
Volume79
Issue23
Pages73437350; # of pages: 8
AbstractMarine macroalgae are rich in bioactive compounds that can, when consumed, impart beneficial effects on animal and human health. The red seaweed Chondrus crispus has been reported to have a wide range of health-promoting activities, such as antitumor and antiviral activities. Using a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model, we show that C. crispus water extract (CCWE) enhances host immunity and suppresses the expression of quorum sensing (QS) and the virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (strain PA14). Supplementation of nematode growth medium with CCWE induced the expression of C. elegans innate immune genes, such as irg-1, irg-2, F49F1.6, hsf-1, K05D8.5, F56D6.2, C29F3.7, F28D1.3, F38A1.5 ZK6.7, lys-1, spp-1, and abf-1, by more than 2-fold, while T20G5.7 was not affected. Additionally, CCWE suppressed the expression of PA14 QS genes and virulence factors, although it did not affect the growth of the bacteria. These effects correlated with a 28% reduction in the PA14-inflicted killing of C. elegans. Kappa-carrageenan (K-CGN), a major component of CCWE, was shown to play an important role in the enhancement of host immunity. Using C. elegans mutants, we identified that pmk-1, daf-2/daf-16, and skn-1 are essential in the K-CGN-induced host immune response. In view of the conservation of innate immune pathways between C. elegans and humans, the results of this study suggest that water-soluble components of C. crispus may also play a health-promoting role in higher animals and humans.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); Aquatic and Crop Resource Development
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number55935
NPARC number21269802
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Record identifiercabe6783-95dd-4387-acd0-f56aa8a64df7
Record created2013-12-13
Record modified2016-05-09
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